Spanish language Spanish Relative Pronouns ~ Pronombres relativos

Just like in English, a Spanish relative pronoun links a dependent/relative clause (i.e., a clause that cannot stand alone) to a main clause. This lesson is a comparative summary of the Spanish relative pronouns que, quien, el que, el cual, and donde. Depending on context, the English equivalents are who, whom, that, which, whose, or where.

Note: In Spanish, relative pronouns are required, whereas in English, they are sometimes optional.


Quien can only refer to people, while que can refer to people or things. Other than that, they are interchangeable in the subject and direct object position.

Quien and que can replace the subject:

El profesor va a ayudarnos. Él vive en Barcelona. 
El profesor, quien / que vive en Barcelona, va a ayudarnos. 

The teacher, who lives in Barcelona, is going to help us.

Las chicas quieren trabajar juntas. Ellas son hermanas.
Las chicas, quienes / que son hermanas, quieren trabajar juntas.

The girls, who are sisters, want to work together.

Voy a comprar el libro. Él tiene cien páginas.
Voy a comprar el libro que tiene cien páginas.

I'm going to buy the book that has 100 pages.

A quien or que can replace the direct object:

Ana quiere al hombre. Yo lo vi.
Ana quiere al hombre que / a quien yo vi.

Ana loves the man (that) I saw.

Perdí la pluma. Mi hermano la compró.
Perdí la pluma que mi hermano compró.

I lost the pen (that) my brother bought.

Quien can replace the object of a preposition (Note that que cannot be used here; if the object is not a person, el que/cual may be used).

La mujer es muy inteligente. Vivo con ella
La mujer, con quien vivo, es muy inteligente. 

The woman, with whom I live, is very smart (or The woman I live with is very smart).

Los estudiantes están aquí. Hablaba de ellos.
Los estudiantes, de quienes hablaba, están aquí.

The students about whom I was talking are here (or The students I was talking about are here).

  
El cual and el que may refer to people or things. El que and el cual are nearly always* interchangeable and have two uses:

1. In nonrestrictive clauses (where the relative pronoun does not limit the person or thing it replaces), el que/cual can be both the subject and the object:

El profesor va a ayudarnos. Él vive en Barcelona. 
El profesor, el que / cual vive en Barcelona, va a ayudarnos. 

The teacher, who lives in Barcelona, is going to help us.

Las chicas quieren trabajar juntas. Ellas son hermanas.
Las chicas, las que / cuales son hermanas, quieren trabajar juntas.

The girls, who are sisters, want to work together.

2. El que/cual can simultaneously replace a human antecedent and be the object of a preposition:

Ana quiere al hombre. Yo lo vi.
Ana quiere al hombre al que / cual yo vi.

Ana loves the man (that) I saw.

Las chicas no han llegado. Mi hermano trabaja con ellas.
Las chicas con las que / cuales mi hermano trabaja no han llegado.

The girls with whom my brother works haven't arrived.

Los estudiantes están aquí. Hablaba de ellos.
Los estudiantes de los que /cuales hablaba están aquí.

The students about whom I was talking are here (or The students [whom] I was talking about are here).

*There are a few situations where cual must be used - see my lesson on el cual.

  
Donde means where and joins a main clause to a dependent or relative clause. It is usually preceded by a preposition.

Es la escuela donde estudié.
That's the school where I studied (or That's the school I studied at).

Busco la puerta por donde podemos salir.
I'm looking for the door through which we can leave.

Es a donde vamos.
That's where we're going.

No sé el país de donde viene.
I don't know the country (where) he's from (or I don't know which country he's from).

  

Spanish Pronouns Spanish for Beginners

  

  

Subscribe to the free 
e Learn Spanish Language
weekly newsletter
Spanish newsletter

  



e Learn Spanish Language



Advertise on
e Learn Spanish Language
Options & Rates

  

  



LKL's sites
  Learn English
  Learn French
  Veggie Table
  LKL homepage